Talks: Keynotes

Software Engineering for Robotic Co-Workers - When Robots Meet People

Keynote

July 26, 2016

Keynote at "ICSOFT", July 26, 2016, Lisboa

   Prof. Uwe Aßmann
   Technische Universität Dresden
   Software Engineering

http://www.icsoft.org/KeynoteSpeakers.aspx

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises.

This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far. However - we must get the software engineering right, and this poses new challenges for research and industry. This talk presents World-Oriented Modeling, a novel principle to separate world modeling and software system programming. If the world model is a formal model, robotic co-working applications can be verified easily.

Slides in pdf

Life with Cyber-Physical Systems

Keynote

Jun 29, 2016

Talk at the workshop and inauguration lecture of Prof. Thomas Schlegel

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are the first step towards the so-called Internet of Things. CPS connect the hardware of our material environment - cars, buildings, office spaces - with intelligent networks of sensors, actuators, and micro-controllers. This new condition of "Every-ware Computing" has many fields of applications: drive-by-wire solutions for autonomous cars, smart workplaces with human-CPS interfaces, or intelligent robots helping elderly people at home. The ultimate goal of CPS is to enable control of space and time of all things constituting our environment. According to this trend, all engineering disciplines will thoroughly change until 2020 - including architecture, transportation, and urban design.

Slides in pdf

Working with Robots in Smart Homes and Smart Factories - Robotic Co-Working

Keynote

Feb 25, 2016

Keynote at Software Engineering, Imperial Riding School, Vienna

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering With Georg Püschel, Christian Piechnick, Maria Piechnick, Jan Falkenberg, Sebastian Werner.

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises. This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far.

Film of the demo of a robotic co-worker at SE 2016 http://web.inf.tu-dresden.de/~ua1/Talks/2016/Video_SE16_Keynote_Assmann.MOV

Co-Working in Industry-4.0 - When Robots Meet People

Keynote

Feb 04, 2016

SoftED User Conference, Art'Hotel Dresden

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering Deputy chair of the DFG Research Training Group "Role-based software infrastructures (RoSI)". With Georg Püschel, Christian Piechnick, Maria Piechnick, Jan Falkenberg, Sebastian Werner.

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises. This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far.

How Cyber-Physical Systems Will Change the World

Keynote

Oct 14, 2014

Keynote at Leibniz-Tagung, Lichtenwalde, Chemnitz, Germany

Cyber-physikalische Systeme kombinieren Sensor-, System- und Aktuatortechnik mit dualer Realität, d.h. koppeln auf kausale Weise Gegenstände in der realen Welt mit Objekten in der Cyber-Welt. Damit spiegelt sich, was in der Cyber-Welt geschieht, in der phyischen Welt und umgekehrt. Cyber-physikalische Systeme bilden die erste Stufe des Internets der Dinge, in der alle Gegenstände der Welt miteinander vernetzt sind und miteinander kommunizieren.

Cyber-physikalische Systeme fallen in zwei Klassen. Welt-Datenbanken bilden die physische Welt in der Cyber-Welt nach, um Realzeit-Anfragen und -Prognosen über die Welt zu ermöglichen. Dazu ist der Einsatz von Sensortechnik unabdingbar. Cloud-Roboter verbinden dies zusätzlich mit Aktuatorik, d.h. verändern die reale Welt durch Manipulation. Wir zeigen in diesem Vortrag einige der Herausforderungen an die Software- und Systemtechnologie für Welt-Datenbanken und Cloud-Roboter auf sowie die Einsatzchancen in einigen Industrien.

Life with Cyber-Physical Systems

Keynote

September 17, 2014

Keynote at the international summer school "SynCity - The City of the Future"

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering http://http://openaccess.tu-dresden.de/ocs/index.php/synCity/synCity2014

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are the first step towards the so-called Internet of Things. CPS connect the hardware of our material environment - cars, buildings, office spaces - with intelligent networks of sensors, actuators, and micro-controllers. This new condition of "Every-ware Computing" has many fields of applications: drive-by-wire solutions for autonomous cars, smart workplaces with human-CPS interfaces, or intelligent robots helping elderly people at home. The ultimate goal of CPS is to enable control of space and time of all things constituting our environment. According to this trend, all engineering disciplines will thoroughly change until 2020 - including architecture, transportation, and urban design.

Towards Ontology-Driven Requirements Engineering

Keynote

Oct. 24, 2011

Keynote at Workshop Semantic-Web Enabled Software Engineering 2011

Prof. Dr. Uwe Aßmann, Katja Siegemund

We present a goal-oriented requirements engineering technique derived from the work of Lambsweerde and show how to realize it with ontologies.

Keynote

September 16, 2010

Keynote at Workshop Modellierung Betrieblicher Informationssysteme (MOBIS), Technische Universität Dresden

U. Aßmann, J. Johannes, M. Seifert, R. Samlaus

For realistic scenarios, software has to incorporate models and code in several technical spaces, i.e., several metamodeling spaces. In this talk, we present bridges between the technical spaces of Ontologyware and the EMF modeling space. We also discuss flexible reuse of models with invasive software composition systems.

Talk also given at:

Aspect-Oriented Web Services

Keynote

Nov 27, 2007

Keynote at European Conference of Web Services, Halle, Germany

Uwe Aßmann, Jendrik Johannes, Sebastian Richly

The web is a dynamic heterogeneous net of components, providing services to each other. How to find these services, how to execute them, how to compose them is a complicated matter and requires massive amount of technology and tools. As one of these technologies, aspect-oriented development has been used for the composition of web services for quite some time. However, we postulate that its era has just begun. Since the world of aspect-oriented development is currently being broadened from implementation languages to modeling languages, aspect-oriented, model-driven development of web services comes into sight. In this new technology, aspect weaving on the model level plays a major role: business processes, relieved from the technical aspects, can be specified in isolation, and refined by aspect model weaving over several levels of models, down to the technical processes, including web services. As a result, a full-blown model-driven, but also aspect-oriented stack of service models results, in which some of thelevels are static, others are dynamic. We present an outline of the technology, as well as tools that are available for its realization.

Collaboration-Based Composition of Languages

Keynote

March 25, 2007Nov. 4, 2009

Keynote at LDTA workshop, Braga, PortugalTechnical Talk at Technische Universität Wien, Lehrstuhl Prof. Knoop

Uwe Aßmann Christian Wende

To achieve compositionality for languages, we transfer the notion of collaboration-based design from software modelling to language design. In software modelling, collaboration schemes (also called role models) describe interactions between model concepts, encapsulating the interactions so that they can be reused in different scenarios. While collaboration schemes have been successfully used for system models, they have not yet been applied to language design, for which they provide a huge potential: they can describe the interaction of language concepts from different language components, explain and constrain their interplay, and adapt them to each other, even if they had not been designed for each other. Hence, the use of collaboration schemes in language design paves the way to a new flexible technique for the composition of languages from off-the-shelf components.

Talk also given at:

Collaboration-Based Language Composition and Evolution or: How to model a newspaper-reading sausage-buying grandfather

Collaboration-Based Composition of Languages

Software aus Komponenten

Keynote

July 2003

Uwe Aßmann

Im Laufe der Zeit hat die Softwaretechnik verschiedene Komponentensyteme entwickelt. Es begann mit modularer Technik, setzte sich mit objektorientierter Technik, klassischen Komponentensystemen, und Web Services fort. In letzter Zeit sind die ersten Ansätze erschienen, die Graue Kästen miteinander komponieren (graybox composition). Dieser Vortrag gibt einen Überblick über Software aus Komponenten, ihre Komponentenmodelle und Kompositionstechniken. Er zeigt auf, warum bestimmte Komponentenmodelle mächtiger und flexibler als andere sind und wann man welches in der Praxis für welchen Zweck einsetzen sollte.

Slides in pdf

The Second Generation Web - Opportunities and Problems

Keynote

appr. Feb. 2002

Keynote at ICSTI conference and general assembly in Stockholm

Dr. Uwe Aßmann http://www.iupac.org/publications/ci/2002/2406/sti.html

The first-generation web appeared in 1990 and brought an industrial revolution - all document formats in all industries have changed since then. We discuss the second-generation web, the "Semantic Web", an initiative started by the W3C and supported by the European Commission.

The Semantic Web technology adds typing to the documents of the future and will serve for better document processing, vocabularies for interoperability and constraint checking of documents and specifications in all industries. It will also improve match-making on web services.

The Next Industrial Revolution - The Semantic Web

Keynote

2001

Keynote at Workshop of Lund University, LUCAS laboratory

Dr. Uwe Aßmann

The first-generation web appeared in 1990 and brought an industrial revolution - all document formats in all industries have changed since then. We claim that the next industrial revolution will be provoced by the "Semantic Web", an initiative started by the W3C and supported by the European Commission. The Semantic Web technology adds typing to the documents of the future and will serve for better interoperability and type-checking of documents and specifications in all industries.

We give an overview on the languages, the difference of static and dynamic semantics, and show the influences of the Semantic Web on document management in different industries. Semantic Web technologies deliver much more powerful checking techniques for the context constraints of static semantics in documents than the usual XML technologies. That is why they lift specification techniques to a new level.

To be early on the train, we propose a Swedish Semantic Web initiative.