Talks of Prof. Uwe Aßmann, Sorted By Year

Talks: TechnicalTalks

LiFi-Based Fog Computing - The Area Between the Cloud and the Edge

Technical Talk

January 27, 2016

Technical Talk at Meeting of Working Group Leaders of Silicon Saxony

Fog Computing is a new reference architecture for sensor networks at the edge of the cloud. Its basic idea is to process data locally, in complex sensor nodes, gateways and routers, before moving them into the cloud. Thereby, it protects privacy by default, and delivers speed (low latency, high bandwidth). Its business perspectives for Germany are tremendous, because starting from the sensor markets, Germany companies can try to penetrate into the future cloud markets. And combined with LED-based transmission of data (LiFi), it will also result in highly energy-efficient infrastructures for Industry 4.0, smart homes and smart environments. Watch out!

A Generalized Form of Autotuning

Technical Talk

Nov 03, 2014

Technical Talk at the seminar of the Collaborative Research Center HAEC

So far, autotuning has been a form of continuous optimization for specific kernels and algorithms. In the Collaborative Research Center “Highly-Adaptive Energy-Efficient Computing (HAEC)”, we develop a generalized form of autotuning for software product lines. The approach is based on cost-utility functions and relations, which are specified in quality contracts. A more specific form treats energy-utility functions, which describe constraints on energy behavior. From these contracts, constraint-based systems are generated to be solved by constraint solvers. Generalized autotuning attributes every variant of a software product line with quality and energy contracts, and then decides at run time of the application, which variant is the most appropriate with regard to a specific objective function. This generalizes autotuning from the level of specific kernels to dynamic software product lines.

Beyond Simple Objects

Technical Talk

Oct 28, 2014

RoSI PhD training group, Kickoff meeting

Roles compartmentalize objects by context.

This compartmentalization helps both on the object and the type level. The number of aliases are reduced, the lifetime of attributes is better known, and the state of an object naturally decomposes by context. Roles therefore improve modeling and programming in many ways.

The RoSI PhD training group investigates many research questions for role-based languages and infrastructures.

Life-by-Wire

Technical Talk

May 05, 2012

Linköpings Universitet, Sweden

We are going from fly-by-wire to drive-by-wire to life-by-wire. Many aspects of our life are already controlled by software and electronics, and many more will be in the future. In this talk, we investigate the technical requirements for reliable cyber-physical systems in the future internet of things (iot). We show that CPS must be self-adaptive to changing requirements, while nevertheless offering full reliability and safety. This can be mastered with MOO architectures based on multi-objective optimization. We also look at the market mechanisms and software platforms for life-by-wire and the resulting software ecosystems. A new global player is searched for the platform leadership for cyber-physical systems.

Filters in Evolution - or: Evolutionary Development

Technical Talk

December 17, 2009

Technical Talk at Workshop at University of Twente, The Netherlands

Uwe Aßmann

We discuss an aspect-oriented decomposition scheme for software, Essence-Administration-Infrastructure (EAI), from Steve McMenamin. We show its similarity to Composition Filters and show how to employ it for simple evolution of software systems.

Software Reuse for the Reuse-Agnostic

Technical Talk

Feb 13, 2009

Technical Talk at Queens University, Kinston, Canada

Jakob Henriksson, Jendrik Johannes, Steffen Zschaler and Uwe Aßmann

Software languages differ in their support for software reuse - some offer pretty poor mechanisms (C, Cobol,…) and others are very smart (BETA, Scala,UML,…). Wouldn’t it be good to be able to separate the reuse mechanism from the core language? Can we define something like Reuse Languages (RL) that can be combined with algorithmic or declarative core languages to support universal reuse mechanisms?

Universal invasive software composition is a new technology to specify reuse languages. Module systems, class systems, fragment systems and other reuse techniques can be developed for languages in a universal way. Given a grammar or metamodel of a core language, a component model can be specified, from which a composition system can be generated that offers sophisticated forms of reuse of all software artefacts written in the core language. Since this works language-universally, all languages, even if they do not offer reuse mechanisms, can be equipped with reuse technology: reuse for the reuse-agnostic. Several examples are presented based on the Reuseware system (www.reuseware.org).

Ontologies in the Software Process

Technical Talk

2005

Technical Talk at Dagstuhl Seminar “XML and Ownership Types”

Prof. Dr. Uwe Aßmann http://www.rewerse.net

For the future Semantic Web, an integration of ontologies into standard languages is urgendly needed. This talk presents a concept for the integration of ontologies as domain models into the MDA process (Model-Driven Architectures). In this way, they can form the basis of a product line.

The talk is supported by the EU 6th framework Network of Excellence REWERSE http://www.rewerse.net

Rapid Ontology Development (RODE) with Pike

Technical Talk

2002

Technical Talk at Linöpings Universitet

Dr. Uwe Aßmann, Martin Nilsson, Leif Stensson, Marcus Comstedt http://www.gotpike.org https://github.com/pikelang http://pike.lysator.liu.se/

For the future Semantic Web, languages for rapid application development are urgendly needed. This talk presents a concept for the integration of ontologies into the scripting language Pike, which is hosted at Linköpings Universitet http://www.gotpike.org

The Swedish Semantic Web Initiative

Technical Talk

2001

Linköpings Universitet

Dr. Uwe Aßmann, Prof. Dr. Peter Fritzson

The first-generation web appeared in 1990 and brought an industrial revolution - all document formats in all industries have changed since then. We claim that the next industrial revolution will be provoced by the “Semantic Web”, an initiative started by the W3C and supported by the European Commission. The Semantic Web technology adds typing to the documents of the future and will serve for better interoperability and type-checking of documents and specifications in all industries. To be early on the train, we propose a Swedish Semantic Web initiative.

Talks: Keynotes

Software Engineering for Robotic Co-Workers - When Robots Meet People

Keynote

July 26, 2016

Keynote at “ICSOFT”, July 26, 2016, Lisboa

   Prof. Uwe Aßmann
   Technische Universität Dresden
   Software Engineering

http://www.icsoft.org/KeynoteSpeakers.aspx

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises.

This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far. However - we must get the software engineering right, and this poses new challenges for research and industry. This talk presents World-Oriented Modeling, a novel principle to separate world modeling and software system programming. If the world model is a formal model, robotic co-working applications can be verified easily.

Slides in pdf

Life with Cyber-Physical Systems

Keynote

Jun 29, 2016

Talk at the workshop and inauguration lecture of Prof. Thomas Schlegel

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are the first step towards the so-called Internet of Things. CPS connect the hardware of our material environment - cars, buildings, office spaces - with intelligent networks of sensors, actuators, and micro-controllers. This new condition of “Every-ware Computing” has many fields of applications: drive-by-wire solutions for autonomous cars, smart workplaces with human-CPS interfaces, or intelligent robots helping elderly people at home. The ultimate goal of CPS is to enable control of space and time of all things constituting our environment. According to this trend, all engineering disciplines will thoroughly change until 2020 - including architecture, transportation, and urban design.

Slides in pdf

Working with Robots in Smart Homes and Smart Factories - Robotic Co-Working

Keynote

Feb 25, 2016

Keynote at Software Engineering, Imperial Riding School, Vienna

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering With Georg Püschel, Christian Piechnick, Maria Piechnick, Jan Falkenberg, Sebastian Werner.

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises. This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far.

Film of the demo of a robotic co-worker at SE 2016 http://web.inf.tu-dresden.de/ua1/Talks/2016/Video_SE16_Keynote_Assmann.MOV

Co-Working in Industry–4.0 - When Robots Meet People

Keynote

Feb 04, 2016

SoftED User Conference, Art’Hotel Dresden

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering Deputy chair of the DFG Research Training Group “Role-based software infrastructures (RoSI)”. With Georg Püschel, Christian Piechnick, Maria Piechnick, Jan Falkenberg, Sebastian Werner.

Co-working is a new trend for integrating smart robots into assembly lines of manufactures. Modern smart robots recognize human beings in their neighborhood and stop when touched. Therefore, they can be integrated into manufacturing lines in small and medium enterprises. Robots come out of the cage, and this creates a lot of opportunities for scalable automation. Because the simple steps of a manufacturing line can be performed by a smart robot and the rest can be done by humans, the investment costs for using robots sink, while the degree of automation can be scaled in small enterprises. This new deployment model of smart robots will have a tremendous effect on all kinds of manufacture, because it changes the costs of robot-based automation in small companies. Entire industries could make use of robots that did not deploy them so far.

How Cyber-Physical Systems Will Change the World

Keynote

Oct 14, 2014

Keynote at Leibniz-Tagung, Lichtenwalde, Chemnitz, Germany

Cyber-physikalische Systeme kombinieren Sensor-, System- und Aktuatortechnik mit dualer Realität, d.h. koppeln auf kausale Weise Gegenstände in der realen Welt mit Objekten in der Cyber-Welt. Damit spiegelt sich, was in der Cyber-Welt geschieht, in der phyischen Welt und umgekehrt. Cyber-physikalische Systeme bilden die erste Stufe des Internets der Dinge, in der alle Gegenstände der Welt miteinander vernetzt sind und miteinander kommunizieren.

Cyber-physikalische Systeme fallen in zwei Klassen. Welt-Datenbanken bilden die physische Welt in der Cyber-Welt nach, um Realzeit-Anfragen und -Prognosen über die Welt zu ermöglichen. Dazu ist der Einsatz von Sensortechnik unabdingbar. Cloud-Roboter verbinden dies zusätzlich mit Aktuatorik, d.h. verändern die reale Welt durch Manipulation. Wir zeigen in diesem Vortrag einige der Herausforderungen an die Software- und Systemtechnologie für Welt-Datenbanken und Cloud-Roboter auf sowie die Einsatzchancen in einigen Industrien.

Life with Cyber-Physical Systems

Keynote

September 17, 2014

Keynote at the international summer school “SynCity - The City of the Future”

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering http://http://openaccess.tu-dresden.de/ocs/index.php/synCity/synCity2014

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are the first step towards the so-called Internet of Things. CPS connect the hardware of our material environment - cars, buildings, office spaces - with intelligent networks of sensors, actuators, and micro-controllers. This new condition of “Every-ware Computing” has many fields of applications: drive-by-wire solutions for autonomous cars, smart workplaces with human-CPS interfaces, or intelligent robots helping elderly people at home. The ultimate goal of CPS is to enable control of space and time of all things constituting our environment. According to this trend, all engineering disciplines will thoroughly change until 2020 - including architecture, transportation, and urban design.

Towards Ontology-Driven Requirements Engineering

Keynote

Oct. 24, 2011

Keynote at Workshop Semantic-Web Enabled Software Engineering 2011

Prof. Dr. Uwe Aßmann, Katja Siegemund

We present a goal-oriented requirements engineering technique derived from the work of Lambsweerde and show how to realize it with ontologies.

Current Trends and Perspectives in Modeling - Between semantic technologies and model reuse

Keynote

September 16, 2010

Keynote at Workshop Modellierung Betrieblicher Informationssysteme (MOBIS), Technische Universität Dresden

U. Aßmann, J. Johannes, M. Seifert, R. Samlaus

For realistic scenarios, software has to incorporate models and code in several technical spaces, i.e., several metamodeling spaces. In this talk, we present bridges between the technical spaces of Ontologyware and the EMF modeling space. We also discuss flexible reuse of models with invasive software composition systems.

Talk also given at:

Current Trends and Perspectives in MDSD - Between semantic technologies and model reuse

Aspect-Oriented Web Services

Keynote

Nov 27, 2007

Keynote at European Conference of Web Services, Halle, Germany

Uwe Aßmann, Jendrik Johannes, Sebastian Richly

The web is a dynamic heterogeneous net of components, providing services to each other. How to find these services, how to execute them, how to compose them is a complicated matter and requires massive amount of technology and tools. As one of these technologies, aspect-oriented development has been used for the composition of web services for quite some time. However, we postulate that its era has just begun. Since the world of aspect-oriented development is currently being broadened from implementation languages to modeling languages, aspect-oriented, model-driven development of web services comes into sight. In this new technology, aspect weaving on the model level plays a major role: business processes, relieved from the technical aspects, can be specified in isolation, and refined by aspect model weaving over several levels of models, down to the technical processes, including web services. As a result, a full-blown model-driven, but also aspect-oriented stack of service models results, in which some of thelevels are static, others are dynamic. We present an outline of the technology, as well as tools that are available for its realization.

Collaboration-Based Composition of Languages

Keynote

March 25, 2007Nov. 4, 2009

Keynote at LDTA workshop, Braga, PortugalTechnical Talk at Technische Universität Wien, Lehrstuhl Prof. Knoop

Uwe Aßmann Christian Wende

To achieve compositionality for languages, we transfer the notion of collaboration-based design from software modelling to language design. In software modelling, collaboration schemes (also called role models) describe interactions between model concepts, encapsulating the interactions so that they can be reused in different scenarios. While collaboration schemes have been successfully used for system models, they have not yet been applied to language design, for which they provide a huge potential: they can describe the interaction of language concepts from different language components, explain and constrain their interplay, and adapt them to each other, even if they had not been designed for each other. Hence, the use of collaboration schemes in language design paves the way to a new flexible technique for the composition of languages from off-the-shelf components.

Talk also given at:

Collaboration-Based Language Composition and Evolution or: How to model a newspaper-reading sausage-buying grandfather

Collaboration-Based Composition of Languages

Software aus Komponenten

Keynote

July 2003

Uwe Aßmann

Im Laufe der Zeit hat die Softwaretechnik verschiedene Komponentensyteme entwickelt. Es begann mit modularer Technik, setzte sich mit objektorientierter Technik, klassischen Komponentensystemen, und Web Services fort. In letzter Zeit sind die ersten Ansätze erschienen, die Graue Kästen miteinander komponieren (graybox composition). Dieser Vortrag gibt einen Überblick über Software aus Komponenten, ihre Komponentenmodelle und Kompositionstechniken. Er zeigt auf, warum bestimmte Komponentenmodelle mächtiger und flexibler als andere sind und wann man welches in der Praxis für welchen Zweck einsetzen sollte.

Slides in pdf

The Second Generation Web - Opportunities and Problems

Keynote

appr. Feb. 2002

Keynote at ICSTI conference and general assembly in Stockholm

Dr. Uwe Aßmann http://www.iupac.org/publications/ci/2002/2406/sti.html

The first-generation web appeared in 1990 and brought an industrial revolution - all document formats in all industries have changed since then. We discuss the second-generation web, the “Semantic Web”, an initiative started by the W3C and supported by the European Commission.

The Semantic Web technology adds typing to the documents of the future and will serve for better document processing, vocabularies for interoperability and constraint checking of documents and specifications in all industries. It will also improve match-making on web services.

The Next Industrial Revolution - The Semantic Web

Keynote

2001

Keynote at Workshop of Lund University, LUCAS laboratory

Dr. Uwe Aßmann

The first-generation web appeared in 1990 and brought an industrial revolution - all document formats in all industries have changed since then. We claim that the next industrial revolution will be provoced by the “Semantic Web”, an initiative started by the W3C and supported by the European Commission. The Semantic Web technology adds typing to the documents of the future and will serve for better interoperability and type-checking of documents and specifications in all industries.

We give an overview on the languages, the difference of static and dynamic semantics, and show the influences of the Semantic Web on document management in different industries. Semantic Web technologies deliver much more powerful checking techniques for the context constraints of static semantics in documents than the usual XML technologies. That is why they lift specification techniques to a new level.

To be early on the train, we propose a Swedish Semantic Web initiative.

Talks: InvitedTalks

Fog Computing - a New Architecture for Data Sovereignity between the Cloud and the Sensor Edge

Invited Talk

June 7, 2016

Invited Talk at Meeting of Working Group Cyber-Physical Systems of Silicon Saxony

Prof. Uwe Aßmann Technische Universität Dresden Software Engineering

Fog Computing is a new reference architecture for sensor networks at the edge of the cloud. Its basic idea is to process data locally, in complex sensor nodes, gateways and routers, before moving them into the cloud. Thereby, it protects privacy by default, and delivers speed (low latency, high bandwidth). Its business perspectives for Germany are tremendous, because starting from the sensor markets, Germany companies can try to penetrate into the future cloud markets.

Fog Computing has a very interesting application area, Robotic Co-Working. The talk reports about a case study of the Chair of Software Engineering for Hannover Fair 2016, WEIR, in which a KUKA LBR iiwa is controlled with a sensor-equipped jacket and glove. The sensor-data aggregation is done via a little fog with an Intel gateway, a laptop, and a robot server. Starting from this example, we show how to program a fog, with a world statechart and an adaptive software platform, SMAGS (smart application grids).

Context-Adaptive Apps for Cloud Robots (Kontextadaptive Apps für Cloud-Roboter)

Invited Talk

June 14, 2014

AIS User Conference Dresden

Cloud-based robots are a specific forms of cyber-physical system, in which sensors, actuators, embedded system and cloud technology have to play together reliably. Future industry–4.0 systems will massively rely on cloud robots, because individualized products, ordered by singular customers, can only be built just-in-time, if a swarm of cloud robots collaborates effectively.

By definition, cloud robots must sense their environment and react on context changes. Therefore, cloud robots pose a new challenge for software engineering: apps running on cloud robots must inherently be context-sensitive and context-adaptive. We present a new software architecture language, Smart Application Grids (SMAGs), for such context-adaptive apps, as well some case studies worked out the ResUbic Lab of Technische Universität Dresden. http://www.resubic.org

Cyber-physikalische Systeme - Eine strategische Chance für Sachsen

Invited Talk

March 09, 2011

Silicon Saxony Day 2011

Cyber-physikalische Systeme (CPS) bilden den ersten Schritt zum Internet der Dinge (IoT). Sie beruhen auf dem Prinzip der “dualen Realität”, in dem jedes Objekt der Realität ein Schattenobjekt in der Cyberwelt erhält, das kausal zusammenhängt und mit dem Anfragen, Simulationen, sowie Voraussagen für die Zukunft ermöglicht werden. CPS werden sehr viele Bereiche derIndustrie revolutionieren, zum Beispiel das Stromnetz, den Verkehr, die Fabrik, und die moderne Stadt.

CPS benötigen Plattformen, auf denen Dritte Plugins liefern, um Produkte mit gemischter Wertschöpfung zu schaffen. Daher ist eine zentrale Frage für Sachsen und Deutschland, wer solche Plattformen bauen und beherrschen wird. Das Dresdner ResUbic Lab der Technischen Universität Dresden besteht aus einer Gruppe von Nachwuchsforschergruppen, die das Thema CPS von 2011–2013 erforschen wird. Watch out!

Der Vortrag beruht auf Studien des BITKOM, der Acatech, sowie des Feldafinger Kreises.

Talk also given at:

Cyber-Physikalische Systeme - Eine strategische Chance für Sachsens Fabrikautomationsfirmen

Cyber-Physikalische Systeme

Softwaretrends für medizintechnische Anwendungen und Telemedizin - Wie Cyber-Physikalische Systeme helfen werden

Model Driven Development (MDD) and Component Based Software Development (CBSD)

Invited Talk

Sept. 21, 2006

Invited Talk at XOOTIC Symposium, Eindhoven University

Prof. Dr. Uwe Aßmann, Technische Universität Dresden

Model-driven development and component-based software development are approaches to product-lines, in which software artifacts, both models or code are reused thoroughly. However, the manner in which skeletons of applications (here called PIMs, platform-independent models, or DSMs, domain-specific models; there called frameworks) are instantiated towards applications, differs enormously. While PIMs are translated towards applications, components are linked, composed, or connected. Is there a way to combine both approaches? How to embed components into MDD, i.e., how to build, design and use MDD components? In the last years, our group has found a way to build fragment-based component models for every language. Given a metamodel of a language L, a component model can be systematically generated for L, so that a reuse-language results, in which fragment components can be composed.

Since this principle is universal, component models for modeling and specification languages come for free and the way to a UML component model is no longer far. With such a component model, many interesting UML-component-based compositions come for free: semantic templates, semantic macros, views, mixin layers, and aspects. Since the underlying tools are universal, this paves the way for true MDD components.

Invasive Software Composition

Invited Talk

March 9, 2004

Professor Uwe Assmann, Department of Computing, Linkopings University, Sweden

This talk presents a new, component based way to construct software systems, “invasive software composition”. This composition method adapts and integrates components, treating them as greyboxes. Although being distinct in design, components may be merged in implementations, leading to highly integrated and more efficient systems. Hence, invasive composition is a technique that can be employed to tackle the design-implementation gap.

Building on a minimal set of program transformations, composition operator libraries can be developed that parameterize, extend, connect, mediate, and aspect-weave components. Hence, invasive composition unifies several software engineering techniques such as generic programming, architecture systems, inheritance, view-based programming, and aspect oriented programming (AOP). Invasive composition is centered around a standard language, Java.

A demonstrator library, COMPOST, is freely available and can be used by the system architect in his everyday processes (http://www.the-compost-system.org).

Slides in pdf

Also given at:

Ecole des Mines, Nantes